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712548 : Chevy V8 to Jeep T150, T176, T4, & T5 Manual Transmission Adapter Bell Housing Kit. (#712548)

712548 : Chevy V8 to Jeep T150, T176, T4, & T5 Manual Transmission Adapter Bell Housing Kit.

Advance Adapter
 
This adapter bellhousing assembly is used to adapt the GM 4.3, V8 to the Jeep series SR4, T-4, T-5, T-150 & T-176 transmission. The bellhousing is used for both 4 cylinder and 6 cylinder applications.
The bellhousing kit includes a 356 T-6 aluminum bellhousing, universal dust cover plate, two pilot bushings with (.670” or .590”) inside pilot diameter, ball pivot, fastening hardware, and adapter instructions.
 
Note: When replacing the 1980-86 Jeep 258 6 cylinders, the original clutch throw-out arm and throw-out bearing will be re-used. Or a Advance Adapters replacement GM arm PN716176 & bearing PNN1714 can be used. All other Jeep CJ-7 applications will need the new throw-out arm and bearing.
 
Note: When replacing a 4 cylinder, you must change the throw-out arm and throw-out bearing. Use Advance Adapters PN716176 throw-out arm, PNN1714 throw-out bearing, and PN716332 bellhousing boot..
 
Note: Don’t forget a new clutch cover, clutch disc and throw-out bearing. We have Centerforce clutch parts in stock and ready for your conversion!!!!
 
Note: Bellhousing does not fit Ford T5
 

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The T5 transmission has the honor of having the longest production run than any other American made manual transmission. The transmission was used by numerous automobile manufacturers in nearly a hundred different applications. Jeep too would introduce the T5 to their product line in the early 1980’s. The introduction of a 5 speed transmission into a Jeep was a welcome sight for many; however, for some the strength and dependability still lied in question.

AMC introduced the “T5” five speed transmissions and its 4 speed counterpart the “T4” into the CJ jeeps in 1982. The T5 transmission evolved from Borg Warners lighter duty SR4 transmission that was previously used in both Jeeps and Fords. The T5 introduced tapered roller bearings on the input shafts and output shafts, an improved design over the roller bearing design of the SR4. The transmission was offered behind the AMC 150 (2.5L) Inline 4 cyl. and the AMC 258 Inline 6 cyl (4.2L). The T5 used all helically cut fully synchronized in all gears, with all helically cut gears. The T5 was a top loaded and top shifted transmission. The shifter was located in a removable rear tailhousing section.

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The T5 transmission case is 9.25 " long in addition to its 6" tailhousing/shifter assembly for a total overall length of 15.25". The T5 case is cast aluminum as is the top cover. The top cover is retained by eleven bolts to the main case. The transmission typically has a casting # of “13-51” or “13-52”.

The T5 had a 23 spline output shaft connecting it to the Dana 300 transfer case in the CJ models. There was also a small production of 1984 Cherokees with the NP207. The transmission input shaft had a 7-1/2" stick out length from the front of the transmission. The input sh

aft was offered with two different spline count options. Input shafts used with the 258 inline 6 engines had 1-1/8" x 10 splines. The AMC four cylinders had transmissions with a 1” 14 spline input shaft. The pilot tips for both input shafts were .59”.

The T5 transmission was Jeeps first venture into a 5 speed transmission. The T5 does not have a compound low gear but does have all around good gearing ratios of: 1st gear 4.03:1 2nd gear 2.37:1, 3rd Gear 1.50:1 4th Gear 1.00:1 5th Gear .86:1 Reverse 3.76:1

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The strength of the T5 has often been debated. It was clearly a better transmission than its predecessor the SR4. It does however have its limits and careful consideration is advised in deciding your best plan of action when contemplating a V8 conversion. Advance Adapters does offer a multi drilled bellhousing to mate a Chevy V8 to the T5. The 712548 bellhousing allows for the retention of the factory clutch pedal configuration. Since we use the same bell housing for Chevy to Ford applications, this bellhousing will also bolt up to popular heavy duty truck transmissions like the Ford T18 and NP435. Customers who choose to use this bellhousing for the T5 have the opportunity to upgrade to other transmissions.   

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The Borg Warner manufactured SR4 was a four-speed transmission primarily used in 1980 to 1982 Jeep CJ models. The transmission was found behind the 151 Iron Duke 4cyl and the AMC 258 Inline 6. The transmission is considered somewhat light duty, yet the transmission often finds its way behind Chevy V8s do to the Iron Dukes familiar Chevy V8 bolt Pattern. Like many transmissions, the SR4 was not originally designed exclusively for the JEEP. The original SR4 was used in 76-79 mustangs. The SR4 transmission the transmission was commonly referred to as the “RAD” and was ran behind Ford 2.3 4cyl and the Ford 302 V8. The top cover of the SR4 actually even has the Ford Blue Oval Logo stamped on it.(see photo) The SR4 is a top loaded transmission features full synchronization in all forward gear. 1st and 2nd synchros are larger than 3rd and 4th. The SR4 gears are all helically cut. The SR4 consists of an internal single-rail shift linkage. Ball bearings are located on front input shaft and rear main output shaft. The cluster gear consists of a shaft sliding through it and is supported by loose needle bearings.

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The SR4 transmission consists of two sections. The aluminum front case is 9-1/4" long. It also features an aluminum top cover retained by eleven bolts. The rear of the SR4 consists of 5.9” rear tailhousing making an overall length 15.25”. The transmission height is 14” and weighs 61lbs. The shifter does not come out of main section of the transmission; rather it is located in the rear tailhousing section of the transmission. The SR4 and JEEP T4 are commonly confused and misidentified as their dimensions are near exact.  Both the SR4 and T4 have a unique "S" curve bend on the handle differentiating them from the 45 degree angle of the T176 shifter . Beside overall dimensions, the SR4 can further be identified by casting #'s of “13-32” and “13-40”. The “13-32” were typically found on AMC 258 inline 6 engines while the “13-40” casting # were for Iron Duke four-cylinder Jeeps.

The Jeep SR4 has a 23 spline rear output shaft for mating to the Dana 300 transfer case. The transmission input shaft has a 7-1/2" input shaft stickout with 1-1/8" x 10 splines. The SR4 does not have a compound low gear but does have all around good gearing. The SR4 was available with two different gear options. The gear ratios were differentiated based on the engine mated to the transmission. The gearing options were:

  • 4 Cylinder Applications

First Gear - 4.07:1

Second Gear - 2.39:1

Thrid Gear - 1.49:1

Forth Gear - 1.00:1

Reverse - 3.95:1

  • 6 Cylinder Applications

First gear - 3.50:1

Second Gear - 2.21:1

Third Gear - 1.43:1

Forth Gear - 1.00:1

Reverse - 3.39:1

 

 

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The strength of the SR4 has often been debated. It is usually a one sided debate as the SR4 clearly is not known for handling heavy V8 horsepower. So what explains the high amount of Chevy V8’s behind the SR4? This can easily be explained by the commonality of the Iron Duke Engine bolt pattern. Since the Iron Duke shares the same 90 degree bolt pattern as the Chevy V8, the Chevy V8 will bolt up to the factory Iron Duke bellhousing. The conversion does require the smaller GM flywheel, mini high torque starter, and modifications to the bellhousing. If replacing the 258 inline 6 engines, Advance Adapters does offer a multi drilled bellhousing to mate to the SR4. The 712548 bellhousing allows for the retention of the factory clutch pedal configuration. Since we use the same bell housing for Chevy to Ford applications, customers who choose to use this bellhousing for the SR4 have the opportunity to upgrade to other transmissions. This bellhousing will also bolt up to popular heavy duty truck transmissions like the Ford T18 and NP435. The SR4 was only used for a short 3 year period. The T176, T4 and T5 would eventually replace the SR4 transmission entirely by 1984.  

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The Tremec T176 transmission was a four-speed transmission used in Jeep vehicles from 1980 to 1986. The transmission is largely considered as one of the better transmissions offered by Jeep during the 80’s. The transmission was used behind the inline 258 engine as well as the AMC 360 V8. The T176 makes a suitable candidate for moderate V8 engine conversions. The T176 transmission was one of 4 manual transmissions used during 1980-86. It is considered relatively stout for its compact size. The T176 can easily be identified from the T4, SR4 and T5 by the shifter coming out of the aluminum top cover rather than the tail housing section. The aluminum top cover is retained by 10 bolts.(see photo) The main case is also cast aluminum. The transmission case length is 10.25" long and used short 2.62” tail housing. The transmission case has casting numbers located on the driver side of the transmission. We have seen a series of casting numbers used. The numbers seem to be a sequential series starting with C-2604203 through C-2604208. The Jeep T176 has a 23 spline output shaft for connecting the transmission to the transfer case. The stick out length for the transmission input is 7-1/2" with 1-1/8" 10 splines. The pilot tip is .59” in diameter. The T176 utilizes a standard 4-H shift pattern with reverse located down and to the right. The T176 is a top loaded, top shifting transmission and is synchronized in all forward gears. The transmission is well engineered and features all helically cut gears. The T176 does not have a compound low gear but does have all around good gearing ratios of:

  • 1st gear 3.52:1
  • 2nd gear 2.29:1,
  • 3rd Gear 1.46:1
  • 4° Gear 1.00:1
  • Reverse 3.52:1

VARIATIONS The T176 also had a couple different offshoots known as the T177 and T178. These were basically the same transmission as the T176 but with minor variations. The T177 and T178 were commonly used in J Series trucks and wagons. The transmissions themselves were not necessarily stronger; rather their variations were more based on gear ratios, input shaft lengths and rear bolt pattern rotations. The T177 and T178 used significantly longer input shafts and a bell housing spacer of 2.75”(see photo) was used to compensate for the deeper engine compartments on the full size Jeeps. The gearing differed as well. We have seen the following gear ratios: T177 3.82, 2.29, 1.46, 1.00 R3.82 T178 3.00, 2.08, 1.47, 1.00, R3.01 Caution should be used when obtaining a T177 or T178 for conversions. The longer inputs normally have to be changed for most engine conversions. As a general rule, any time an input shaft needs to be changed the cluster it meshes with must have the same tooth count. Since the T176, T177, and T178 have varying first gear ratios, their cluster gears also varied, for example we have seen cluster gear tooth counts of 19, 20 and 22. It is therefore critical to select the shorter input transmissions if an engine conversion is desired.

V8 CONVERSIONS The T176 transmission is well suited for mild to moderate V8 conversions. The transmission is relatively stout and seems to handle V8 well. It is considered a medium duty transmission; however, so horsepower and tire size may dictate upgrading to a more heavy duty transmission at some point. The front bolt pattern of the T176 takes many by surprise. The transmission actually shares the same bolt pattern as Ford. This bolt pattern is commonly referred to as the Ford butterfly bolt pattern. It measures 8.5” (top side to side) x 6.3” (top to bottom) x 9.25” (bottom side to side). This common bolt pattern clearly offers a relatively easy route for bolting a ford 302 to the T176 by factory ford bell housing. The difficulty in this conversion lies in the fabrication required to retain the factory clutch pedal configuration. The Chevy V8 conversion is more popular and the Advance Adapters bell housing allows for the retention of the factory clutch pedal configuration. Since we use the same bell housing for Chevy to Ford applications, customers who choose to use this bellhousing for the T176 have the opportunity to upgrade to other transmissions. This bellhousing will also bolt up to popular truck transmissions like the Ford T18 and NP435. Advance Adapters also offers a plate design to use with a factory Chevy bellhousing. The kit offers a slight savings in relation to our full bellhousing; however, an additional kit is required for retaining the clutch pedal linkage. In 1986 Jeep retired the CJ7 in favor of the YJ Wrangler. The new Wrangler would also see the introduction of a new series of 5 speed transmissions and with it the discontinuance of the T176

 

  In 1976, Jeep introduced the compact and durable T150 transmission. The T150 would be the last 3 speed transmission offered by Jeep. The transmission was used for a mere 3yrs and proved to be quite successful behind the AMC 258 inline 6 and the AMC 304 V8 engines.


The T150 offers a completely helical cut gear set and is synchronized in all forward gears. The T150 would follow coarse with the T15 and offer a sliding clutch collar rather than sliding gears. This feature would prove essential for the strength needed to handle the bigger V8’s. The transmission gear ratios for this transmission are 2:99 1 first gear, 1.75:1 second gear, 1:1 third gear and 3.17:1 reverse.


The T150 case is cast iron as is the top cover and is retained by 8 bolts. The transmission measures in at 9.25” in over length and weighs approximately 85 lbs. The T150 may have the following casting numbers: 2603983 or 2603347 on the driverside. A further casting number of 2603357 may be located on the top of the transmission. The rear of the T150 was always a 1-3/8" x 6 spline output shaft for mounting to the input gear of the transfer case. The T150 was used exclusively behind the Dana 20 transfer case.


Unlike many Jeep transmissions before it, The T150 was mated to the bellhousing directly and did not use an adapter plate. The front bolt pattern of the T150 is uncharacteristic yet surprising common. The T150 actually shares the same bolt pattern as Ford. This bolt pattern is commonly referred to as the “Ford Butterfly” and measures 8.5” side to side and 6.25” from top to bottom. The T150 input shaft is also the same as Ford’s 10 spline 1-1/16th” diameter. The similarities between the T150 and Ford are uncanny and clearly open some interesting interchangeability options. For example, the T150 will bolt up to a factory Ford “butterfly” bellhousing by using a special pilot bushing and by trimming the transmission pilot tip by 5/8". Likewise a Ford transmission like a T18 or a NP435 would bolt up to AMC bellhousing with a special pilot bushing. The T150 also makes a great candidate for a Chevy conversion and can easily be mated by the use of an adapter.

After 1979, Jeep discontinued the T150. The transmission served its purpose of handling V8 power while maintaining a very compact size required for the CJ5; however, the transmission did not appeal to the consumer. It was clear, American consumers were looking for more than just a three speed. The discontinuance of CJ5 for the longer CJ7 would allow for the longer more modern 4 and 5 speeds transmissions.

Top Review

5/5

by Ron Siewerth, from Poway, CA

Very Pleased

I am very pleased with both the quality of the part I ordered, and the great customer service. The part was on my doorstep 4 days after I ordered it. Ill get all my future parts I need from Advance Adapters, and would reccomend them to anyone, without hesitation.

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